CIRD

Citizen's Institute on Rural Design

Articles

  • The White House Convening on Rural Placemaking

    December 1, 2015

    On November 17, 2015, the White House Rural Council in partnership with Project for Public Spaces and the National Main Street Center, hosted The White House Convening on Rural Placemaking. The convening brought together federal, state and local public sector officials, national non-profit organizations, foundations, and individuals to discuss how federal, state, and philanthropic entities can support and leverage the power of placemaking.

  • Invitation to Communities to Host Design Workshops that Address Specific Local Design Challenges

    October 27, 2015

    It is our pleasure to announce CIRD's 2016-2017 Request for Proposals for Rural Communities Facing Design Challenges. The RFP is intended to help small towns and rural communities, with populations of 50,000 or less, build their capacity and acquire technical expertise to solve their design challenges.

  • Franklin for a Lifetime: Promoting Livability through Age-Friendly Design.

    July 15, 2015

    Franklin, New Hampshire, like many post-industrial communities, is seeking ways to bolster employment opportunities and revitalize its downtown. In addition to finding ways to spur economic development, Franklin wants to ensure the availability of affordable housing options for seniors, who often leave the city to find housing elsewhere, robbing Franklin of vital civic, economic, and cultural resources Franklin for a Lifetime focused on creating a healthy and vibrant community and a reinvigorated downtown for all ages to enjoy. 

  • The Whole Is Greater than the Sum of Its Parts: A Journey through Lancaster County’s Towns and Villages

    June 10, 2015

    Within a stone’s throw of the state capital of Nebraska are the twelve incorporated towns and villages of Lancaster County. Their populations hover around a few hundred each, save for the 3,227 residents of Waverly. The proximity of these communities to Lincoln is both blessing and curse. The nearby schools, institutions, jobs, retail, restaurants, and cultural destinations are fantastic assets. Yet, the flip side is Lincoln dominates the majority of economic and cultural activity in the county. The towns of Lancaster County want to be seen as more than just bedroom communities. They want to provide a diverse set of experiences and services, both public and private. More than anything, they want their residents to have a sense of ownership and civic pride over their community. In this context, Citizens’ Institute on Rural Design , in partnership with the The Lincoln/Lancaster County Planning Department oversaw a two-and-a-half day workshop intended to create a toolbox of design techniques and resources to help the villages of Lancaster County recapture their sense of place. There is no single path for achieving these goals, but the folks of Lancaster County already had a better sense than most that it requires a mixture of services, programming, and amenities.

  • Tips for More Nimble and Inclusive Rural Design

    May 7, 2015

    We spoke to Maria Sykes, a citizen architect and the co-founder of the public interest design firm Epicenter, to learn more about what it takes for rural projects to become successful.

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