A Journey through Lancaster County’s Towns and Villages

The landscape of Lancaster County, Nebraska is dominated by the state’s capitol, Lincoln, whose institutions and cultural resources serve as fantastic assets to the community. Lincoln drives the economic growth and cultural vitality of the county. However, in the shadow of Lincoln are the twelve incorporated towns and villages of Lancaster County that have a unique history, culture, and community members with a sense of purpose. This past March, the Citizens’ Institute on Rural Design ™, in partnership with the Lincoln/Lancaster County Planning Department, convened a two-and-a-half day workshop to assist 12 rural villages of Lancaster County, Nebraska, recapture their sense of place and cultural identity.

From the Blog

  • hoto Credit: Wolfram Burner, Flickr Creative Commons, https://flic.kr/p/aHg34i

    Seven Tips for Increasing Participation in Your Community Design Project

    June 24, 2015
    Public Participation is essential to a successful community project. However, spreading the word about your project can be challenging. Luckily, with the increasing number of online options combined with traditional methods, the challenge rests in selecting the most cost-effective communications alternative. In this article we give you seven tips to help you develop an effective communications strategy.
  • The Whole Is Greater than the Sum of Its Parts: A Journey through Lancaster County’s Towns and Villages

    June 10, 2015
    The landscape of Lancaster County, Nebraska is dominated by the state’s capitol, Lincoln, whose institutions and cultural resources serve as fantastic assets to the community. Lincoln drives the economic growth and cultural vitality of the county. However, in the shadow of Lincoln are the twelve incorporated towns and villages of Lancaster County that have a unique history, culture, and community members with a sense of purpose. This past March, the Citizens’ Institute on Rural Design ™, in partnership with the Lincoln/Lancaster County Planning Department, convened a two-and-a-half day workshop to assist 12 rural villages of Lancaster County, Nebraska, recapture their sense of place and cultural identity.
Map showing locations of CIRD Workshops
Where We Work

Established in 1991, the Citizens' Institute on Rural Design has convened more than 60 workshops in all regions of the country, empowering residents to leverage local assets for the future in order to build better places to live, work, and play.

Stay Connected

Capacity Building Calls

CIRD supports host communities before and after their workshops via informational conference calls and webinars that cover critical topics in community engagement, rural design, partnership development, and workshop planning.